Make Sure to Change Your Privacy Settings on Facebook…Again!

Tired of changing your privacy settings on Facebook? Well… Sorry!  You need to do it again…  If you do not want Facebook to track your browsing both on and off their site and track the apps you use, change your settings!

argyllfreepress.com
argyllfreepress.com
Today, Facebook announced that it would begin targeting advertisements to users based on the websites they visit and apps that they use. In a blog post, the company explained that users can opt out of the web browser-based tracking through an online ad industry program and can also opt out of the app-based tracking through their smartphones’ privacy controls.

If you have to see ads while using Facebook, they might as well cater to your specific needs and likes, right? It’s seemingly harmless and most people do not have anything to hide. However, this kind of customization is a double edge sword. On one side you have the benefit of a tailored experience while on the other hand your private searching is being consumed by entities like Facebook. A more specific and more troubling concern is that children as young as 13 will be monitored… Are your teens thinking about the ramifications of having Facebook watch their every movement? Congress is promising to monitor the implications of this new advertising system and so should you. Your privacy and the privacy of your family is important! 

Privacy is the price of convenience. Decide which one matters to you most.

How Much of Your Data can Apple Hand to Law Enforcement?

We are all aware (or at least we should be) that our telecom providers are handing over our data to the police when necessary. Well have you ever wondered just how much and what it takes to get that data? iphone-privacy-2011-04-06-1302104043Apple posted their new guidelines describing what data the company can provide to law enforcement and the processes for requesting that data.

The document breaks it down into two basic types of data: information stored on Apple’s servers and information stored locally on iOS devices.  I have outlined the kinds of data and how they can be obtained in a chart below.

Essentially anything you’ve backed up to or stored on iCloud is available for Apple to provide to law enforcement, including connection logs and IP addresses you’ve used. Additionally a lot of the data associated with your Apple ID is available as well. Therefore, any information you’re providing Apple is available for them to pass along. This is something to consider when deciding if or what to back up on iCloud.  You may want to avoid backing up sensitive company data or private information on iCloud. Some information cannot be avoided, such as anything associated with your Apple ID.

Can they access data on my iOS device???

Yes. Apple can bypass security passcodes on our iOS devices to extract “certain categories of active data,” though it apparently cannot bypass that protection entirely. If provided with a valid search warrant, Apple can hand over SMS messages, pictures and videos, contacts, audio recordings, and your phone’s call history, but it can’t access e-mails, calendar entries, or information from third-party applications. Devices must be running iOS 4 or newer, must be “in good working order,” and must be provided directly to Apple’s headquarters along with an external storage drive twice the size of the iOS device’s internal storage.

Will I know if this is happening?

Maybe. The guidelines state that Apple will “notify its customers when their personal information is being sought in response to legal process except where providing notice is prohibited by the legal process itself.” Apple will also avoid notifying users if the company “believes that providing notice could create a risk of injury or death to an identifiable individual or group of individuals or in situations where the case relates to child endangerment,” though this is entirely up to Apple and not to the law enforcement agencies involved. These notification requirement will help prevent random and unfounded searches.

What is missing?

The policies and capabilities surrounding iCloud Keychain, iMessages and FaceTime calls are unclear and disputed. Apple claims iMessage & Facetime are encrypted but there is some speculation otherwise.

Is this unusual?

No, other tech companies have similar policies. For example, Google provides a similar “Transparency Report” outlining the types of data available to law enforcement. The notification policy is new and several other tech giants, including Facebook and Microsoft, have already indicated that they plan to expand their policies on notifying customers whose data has been requested by law enforcement

 

Where is the Data? Type of Data Means to Obtain Data Restrictions
Information stored on Apple Servers Data Associated with your Apple ID contact inormation obtainable with a subpoena or greater legal process
customer service records
transaction history both in store & online
iTunes gift card information
Data Associated with your iCloud Account connection logs & IP address used Any iCloud information that the user deletes cannot be accessed.
60 days of iCloud mail logs that “include records of incoming and outgoing communications such as time, date, sender e-mail addresses, and recipient e-mail addresses” e-mail logs require a court order or search warrant
any e-mail messages that the user has not deleted requires a search warrant
any other information that can be backed up to iCloud – As of this writing, this list includes contacts, calendars, browser bookmarks, Photo Stream photos, anything that uses the “documents and data” feature (which can include not just word processors but also photo and video apps, games, and data from other applications), and full device backups
Information stored locally on iOS devices SMS messages requires a search warrant – Devices must be running iOS 4 or newer, must be “in good working order,” and must be provided directly to Apple’s headquarters along with an external storage drive twice the size of the iOS device’s internal storage. Cannot access e-mails, calendar entries, or information from third-party applications
pictures and videos
contacts
audio recordings
phone’s call history

35 Senators Ask Tough Questions Re: Internet Transition

Today, 35 U.S. Senators lead by Senators John Thune (R-S.D.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) sent a letter to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), seeking clarification regarding the recent announcement that NTIA intends to relinquish responsibility of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions to the global multistakeholder community. Read my previous post “US to Relinquish Control of the Internet” for more background on this issue.

The letter express the group’s “[strong] support [of] the existing bottom-up, multistakeholder approach to Internet governance.” The letter highlights bipartisan support of S. Con. Res 50 in 2012 that reinforces “the U.S. government’s opposition to ceding control of the Internet to the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), an arm of the United Nations, or to any other governmental body.”

The group cautions: “We must not allow the IANA functions to fall under the control of repressive governments, America’s enemies, or unaccountable bureaucrats.”  To read the full text of the letter click here.

As you read it I encourage you to think about a few things: 

Are these the right questions?

These are fair questions and likely on the minds of those invested in the outcome of this transition. ICANN & NTIA have pledged transparency throughout this process, therefore, I look forward to their candid responses. None of the questions are out of line or beyond the scope of Congressional oversight.

What other questions should we ask?

The answers to these questions will spark additional questions. However, in my opinion, there are a few other questions the Senators could have posed.

  • What happens if the deadline is not met? Is the US prepared to renew the contract? Is the US prepared for the international backlash if the deadline is not met?
  • Does the structure of an organization like ICANN, that has an entire constituency of comprised of government representatives (GAC),  meet the nongovernmental multistakeholder model? To what extent and how are governments going to be kept out of oversight after the initial launch?
  • Whose interests does NTIA seek to serve or protect by initiating this transition?

What other questions do you have?

How hard do you want Congress to push on this issue?

Transparency will help alleviate fears and misconceptions. I think the answers to these questions and those likely to follow with help shape the dialogue as this process continues. Gaining the confidence of the American people and other inter nation critics will serve to make this a smoother process for NTIA and ICANN. I encourage Congress to pursue the answers to these questions and then decisions can be made about how to proceed.

This issue has a long way to go before we can develop a definitive perspective on the positive or negative effect this will have on the future of the Internet.  I will continue to monitor the developments but I encourage you think about what concerns you most and leave your thoughts in the comments.

 

The below are highlights of the questions asked:

  • Please provide us with the Administration’s legal views and analysis on whether the United States Government can transition the IANA functions to another entity without an Act of Congress. 
  • Please explain why it is in our national interest to transition the IANA functions to the “global multistakeholder community.” 
  • Why does the Administration believe now is the appropriate time to begin the transition, and what was the specific circumstance or development that led the Administration to decide to begin the transition now?
  • What steps will NTIA take to ensure the process to develop a transition plan for the IANA functions is open and transparent?
  • Will NTIA actively participate in the global multistakeholder process to develop a transition plan for the IANA functions, or will the Administration leave the process entirely in the hands of ICANN?
  • What specific options are available to NTIA to prevent [a government or inter-governmental solution] from happening?
  • How can the Administration guarantee the multistakeholder organization that succeeds NTIA will not subsequently transfer the IANA functions to a government or intergovernmental organization in the future, or that such successor organization will not eventually fall under the undue influence of other governments?
  • How did NTIA determine that ICANN is the appropriate entity to lead the transition process, and how will NTIA ensure that ICANN does not inappropriately control or influence the process for its own self-interest? 
  • Does NTIA believe ICANN currently is sufficiently transparent and accountable in its activities, or should ICANN adopt additional transparency and accountability requirements as part of the IANA transition? 
  • Is it realistic to expect that an acceptable transition plan can be developed before the IANA functions contract expires on September 30, 2015?  Is there another example of a similar global stakeholder transition plan being developed and approved in just 18 months? 
  • How will NTIA ultimately decide whether a proposed transition plan for IANA, developed by global stakeholders, is acceptable?  What factors will NTIA use to determine if such a proposal supports and enhances the multistakeholder model; maintains the security, stability, and resiliency of the Internet Domain Name System; meets the needs and expectation of the global customers and partners of the IANA services; and maintains the openness of the Internet? 
  • Will NTIA also take into account American values and interests in evaluating a proposed transition plan?  How? 

Bitcoin: How will this new “currency” affect you?

The other day I was making a purchase online and listed along with the other payment options– pay pal and credit card– was bitcoin…. What’s a bitcoin?  Can you actually use this to make purchases? Is this form of payment secure? How do I get bitcoins?

What is a Bitcoin?
 

A bitcoin is a form of virtual currency that only operates in cyberspace.

A virtual currency can be defined as a type of unregulated, digital money, which is issued and usually controlled by its developers, and used and accepted among the members of a specific virtual community. In 2009, the “Bitcoin” network was launched, introducing a worldwide virtual currency.

Bitcoin permits buyers and sellers to interact anonymously to facilitate instantaneous payments for goods and services, without the involvement of a third-party such as a bank. Bitcoin may be purchased to start but you must “mine” bitcoins. Mining is a resource-intensive processes where miners use special software to solve math problems and are issued a certain number of bitcoins in exchange.  Here are a few interesting facts about Bitcoin:

  • Bitcoin is typically stored on a user’s personal computer or in cloud based accounts called “wallets.”
  • Bitcoin wallets do not meet the UCC’s definition of a deposit account as they are not maintained with a bank.
  • Bitcoin wallets are not insured by the FDIC.​
  • Bitcoin has a high likelihood for extreme value fluctuations.
  • Bitcoin is gaining popularity.
 
The Warning!
On March 11, 2014, FINRA issued an Investor Alert to caution investors of the “significant risks” of buying and speculating in bitcoin and other digital currencies, as well as the risk of fraud and cybercrime related to online bitcoin exchanges and other bitcoin-related service providers.
Specifically, the alert outlines several risks surrounding the usage of and speculating in bitcoin, including:

  • Bitcoin and other digital currencies are not legal tender and if the trust built up among individual users and businesses should vanish, bitcoin would be valueless.
  • Online exchanges that allow users to buy and sell bitcoin and digital wallet services that allow users to store bitcoin are magnets for cyberthieves.
  • Because bitcoin transactions are essentially anonymous, users must take extra care to avoid fraudsters posing as legitimate services.
  • Bitcoin has been used for illicit transactions and such activities could impact users and speculators if an online exchange or service is shut down by law enforcement.
  • Price volatility has been bitcoin’s hallmark in recent years, and there is no uniform value of bitcoin across the various exchanges.

Is bitcoin the future?
Given the variable nature of bitcoin, it’s hard to foresee the future. Many questions remain: How will state or federal legislators regulate the bitcoin system?  Will volatility and data security destroy confidence in bitcoin?  Will bitcoin emerge as a standard payment option, remain a niche product, or otherwise become less interesting, but more predictable under new regulations? Will the average consumers embrace this new currency?

 
​Should Small Business Owners Use Bitcoin?
I would caution against it if your company will not survive the associated risks and building the necessary infrastructure. Accepting bit coin will necessitate updates to refund and exchange policies, calculation of sales tax, when to lock in the rate, etc.  Additionally, users will need to monitor developing regulations and consumer perception of bitcoin.  This volatility can be hard on sellers especially small sellers that rely on every dollar to survive and thrive. 
 
The retailers and other businesses that have announced that they are accepting bitcoin as payment are not established “brand” names that perhaps have a higher risk tolerance. One exception may be Overstock.com.  The major brands may soon follow. We have seen Vegas casinos, and Congressman accepting bitcoin.  But it seems the major brands are waiting to see how legislation develops,how consumer opinion develops, if the value will stabilize, etc before dabbling in a currency that offers little to no stability. The companies using bitcoin are predominately brands that have the benefit of anonymity, are seeking publicity or have a consumer base that is actively using bitcoin and will understand the volatility. Unless you run a tech business that caters to the bitcoin-savy, use caution when exploring new payment options. Your budding company may not bounce back from a dive in the value or new regulations that may emerge. Build a strong brand and strong consumer base then consider taking risks. Bitcoin may not be going away anytime soon but asses legal/regulatory, commercial/financial, and reputational risks before deciding whether to make bitcoin a part of your business.

 

US to Relinquish Control of the Internet?

On Friday, the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced it is giving up control of a system that directs Internet traffic and Web addresses. As a result, Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the nonprofit organization charged with managing the Internet, is tasked to convene global stakeholders to develop a proposal to transition the current role played by NTIA in the coordination of the Internet’s domain name system (DNS). This announcement came as a surprise to many but a coalition of nations has been calling for the US to relinquish control of the Internet for at least the last nine months. Politically this takes the US out of the line of fire but practically what does this do for the culture of the Internet?

Why is this important to you? Because it may change the Internet as you know it….

What exactly was the US Doing?

NTIA is the Executive Branch agency that advises the President on telecommunications and information policy issues. NTIA’s programs and policymaking focus largely on expanding broadband Internet access and adoption in America. NTIA controls the DNS which essentially converts the web addresses (URLs) we type in to the search bar into the correct IP address to retrieve the website you requested. Whether you are accessing a Web site or sending e-mail, your computer uses DNS to look up the domain name you’re trying to access. This system is essential to the functionality and security of the Internet.

If not the US, then who?
This contract to control DNS has allowed the U.S. government to exert what some claim is too much influence over the Internet. technology that plays such a pivotal role in society and the economy. So if not the US, then who with the world feel comfortable wielding that power and influence?

There’s a meeting, ICANN 49, March 23 in Singapore and the future of the Internet is at the top of the agenda.

According to Lawrence Strickling, assistant secretary at the Commerce Department, “[The department] will not accept a proposal that replaces the NTIA’s role with a government-led or intergovernmental solution.” Does that leave ICANN or a similar organization to maintain the DNS?

Why should you care?
Because this could mean a very different Internet…

While companies like Verizon applaud the moveITIF and other organizations have argued before that U.S. government oversight has played an essential role in maintaining the security, stability, and openness of the Internet and in ensuring that ICANN satisfies its responsibilities in effectively managing the Internet’s DNS. Without the U.S. government’s presence some lawmakers and members of the tech industry have expressed concern that relinquishing control of IANA will open up the Internet to threats from other governments that seek to censor it.  This could mean a very different Internet.

Are their concerns justified? No one really knows right now but what we can surmise is that the Internet is in for some changes in the years to follow the change of control. Many countries have dealt with privacy and censorship in ways different from that of the US. How will ICANN deal with these conflicting views democratically and ensure Internet users from all economies and sovereign nations will be represented and heard? Will the standards of openness and free flow of information embraced today remain the baseline? Does the “global multistakeholder community” NTIA is referring to exist? What is the legal jurisdiction for both ICANN and this new multistakeholder body?

There are no answers to these questions because so little is known about whats to come. I look forward to the information and ideas that flow from the ICANN meeting next week.  The questions need to be among those at the top of the list.

Do Not Track Me… But Cater to Me

We have all become accustomed to having our technology cater to most of our needs in very personal way. However, we all desire to retain a certain amount of privacy.  For example, our cellphones track our every move and click while occasionally make calls – and yet we would be lost without the maps and ability to request anything from “Siri.” Our cable boxes may bring our favorite shows and movies but they also report back to providers all of your family’s television viewing habits.  We all appreciate the convenience that customization provides however that means a loss of privacy….

Why Are We Worried?
The latest buzz word is the The Internet of Things (IoT). What is that? “The Internet of Things” refers to the concept that the Internet is no longer just a global network for people to communicate with one another using computers, but it is also a platform for devices to communicate electronically with the world around them. The result is a global “network of physical objects that contain embedded technology to communicate or interact with people, things, and the external environment. It includes everything from traffic sensors to refrigerators, thermostats, medical devices, and wristwatches that can track or sense the environment and use the data they collect to provide a benefit, or transmit the data to a central repository for analysis, or both.”

This network of objects enables providers of goods and services to use your personal behavior to profile and evaluate your activities and habits.  The Internet of Things will result in increased data collection, amplifying the importance of simplifying choices and giving control to individuals with real-time notices. Transparency will facilitate consumer understanding of the collection, use and sharing of personal data. However, there is a real danger of data being used in unexpected ways. The Internet of Things has created a potential perfect storm of four major information policy concerns: online safety, privacy, security, and intellectual property issues. The goal is to determine what “reasonable” expectations regarding data usage should be, and then manage consumer expectations accordingly. Measures ensuring the network’s resilience to attacks, data authentication, access control and client privacy need to be established.  An ideal framework would consider the underlying technology and involve collaboration on an international scale.

The need to balance reasonable activity on the Internet and use of The Internet of Things with responsible privacy protections is exponentially increasing. This balance is extremely important because the last thing we want is to stifle innovation by over legislating this area.

Laws to Watch
At least 14 states have proposed legislation on the 2014 docket that is intended to increase privacy protection for consumers and limit both government and private sector surveillance via the Internet of Things. At the federal level, several bills are already making their way through Congress.

State
AB370, an amendment to the California Online Privacy Protection Act of 2003 (“CalOPPA”). CalOPPA requires owners of commercial websites and online service providers (“operators”) to conspicuously post a privacy policy. The privacy policy must disclose to consumers, among other things, the categories of personally identifiable information (PII), such as name, hone address, email address, social security number,  the operator collects and with whom the operator shares such information. Operators affected by CalOPPA include website operators and, as interpreted by the California Office of Attorney General, operators of software and mobile apps that transmit and collect PII online.

Federal 
The Black Box Privacy Protection Act is a bill in front of Congress that prohibits the sale of automobiles equipped with event data recorders-unless the consumer can control the recording of information. Additionally, the data collected would belong to the vehicle owner.

The We are Watching You Act is a bill in front of Congress that requires the operator of a video service (such as a DVR or Xbox) to display the message “We are watching you” as part of the programming provided to the consumer prior to the device is collecting visual or auditory information from the viewing area. This is not likely to pass but its a sign of legislation to come.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has this phenomenon on its radar, it hosted an all-day workshop entitled, “Internet of Things: Privacy and Security in a Connected World in November. The FTC has also released a number of reports and guidelines that direct business on how to protect consumer privacy.

International 
With Internet Governance on the forefront of international discussion, international “Internet of Things” legislation is not the priority and likely to be left up to each country to decipher. International collaboration on issues like this early is one out come I hope comes from these Internet Governance talks…. but we’re a long way out from that happening.

The examples listed are a narrow sampling of privacy legislation designed to protect users from unwanted intrusions. Most notably, states have passed a number of laws protecting privacy rights in recent years.

Conclusion
The Internet of Things will bring tremendous new benefits to consumers but we must balance the need for consumer privacy. State, federal and international regulators must work to restrict government and private-sector collection and control of the data IoT will create. In the meantime, make sure you are aware of the information you provide through your IoT. Explore privacy settings and read privacy policies if you are concerned about sharing too much data with providers. Know what your priorities are as it relates to customization and privacy. If you value convenience and do not mind a prying eye or two, if it means a personalized user experience, share your data freely. However, if you value preserving your privacy be proactive about doing so until lawmakers can find the appropriate balance. Do not shun technology just educate yourself.

Why companies should beware of the BYOD movement and how to mitigate potential damage

BYOD (bring your own device) is a buzz word amongst company IT departments and policy makers.  BYOD is an employee-purchased and owned device (i.e., laptop, smartphone, tablet) that is connected to a corporate information network system or otherwise used to conduct company business. A recent Cisco study found that 90% of full-time American workers use their personal smartphones for work purposes. In this cyber age where privacy and cyber security are major concerns for employers and employees alike, BYOD is a proverbial minefield for those unaware of the legal, security and privacy risks.

Emerging BYOD Legal Risks

In this world of telecommuting and start-ups, many companies allow employees to use their own laptops and smartphones. Companies have thereby ended the Apple v. Android, Mac v. PC debates, a win-win for employees and their employees.  This all might sound great for both employers and employees, but as with any new invention, the risks of BYOD policies have not yet been resolved.  Nor have we seen any BYOD policies take center stage of a publicized legal dispute. We have, however, seen disputes arise over storing company data on personal devices. In Barrette Outdoor Living, Inc. v. Michigan Resin Representatives, the Court ordered an employee to pay $35,000 in sanctions for failing to preserve his cellular phone and deleting 270,000 company files from his personal laptop. Even when using a personal device, employees may have a duty to maintain corporate information if their employer goes to trial. Employees may face personal legal liability for actions taken while using their BYOD device.

Understanding BYOD Security Risks

When employees have access to company networks and data through their personal devices, the company becomes increasingly vulnerable to security and legal risks. Companies that allow broad access face the risk of employees to deleting company data and are susceptible to the carelessness of employees and third-party users. These users can be anyone from a child using a parent’s phone to office visitors connecting to the company wi-fi. When BYODs and third-party devices bypass security features normally applied to corporate devices, they are vulnerable to malware—a costly risk, particularly in regard to Android devices. Additionally, BYODs that bypass network security elevate the risk of non-compliance with data privacy laws and regulatory requirements.[1]

Mitigating Security Risks & Maintaining Employee Privacy

The most effective mitigation strategy will couple emerging tools with a BYOD policy to protect company assets and security, examples of which include:

  • Developing a BYOD policy that addresses ownership, password requirements, employee privacy, liability, limitations on access/use, search parameters and what situations trigger which reactions.
  •  Selectively publishing company data to new mobile apps; users get the data they need, and the company has greater control over data security.
  • Requiring device encryption.
  • Installing software to track which documents employees download.
  • Installing technology to wipe only corporate settings, data and apps to protect business assets while leaving personal data and settings intact.
  • Exploring geo-fencing to protect company information and prevent data breach by disabling device features such as the camera within company space.

Use and implementation of these tools will depend on company needs but should be considered to mitigate legal, security and privacy risks.

 

To see more from me on this issue visit: http://techpageone.dell.com/technology/byod-policies-tangle-hr-legal/

Five things you should know as the new gTLDs launch

What is a gTLD? gTLD stands for generic top-level domain and is an Internet extension such as “.COM,” “.NET” or “.ORG.” Right now there are a little over two dozen gTLDs, but soon, there could be hundreds. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is responsible for the coordination of the global Internet’s systems of unique identifiers and, in particular, ensuring its stable and secure operation. According to ICANN the new gTLD program was developed to increase competition and choice in the domain name space. As the new gTLDs launch and threaten to change the Internet as we know it there are a lot of things you should know but here are five to start. For additional background information about new gTLDs, please visit some of my previous posts “What do you know about the new top level domains?” & “Will You Be Confused When The New Generic Top Level Domains (gTLDs) Launch?”

1. Be careful of services “guaranteeing” to get a domain name for you

Cyrus Namazi, Vice President of DNS Industry Engagement for ICANN, published a blog post today titled “Pre-Reserve a Domain Name, or Not? ICANN Answers the QuestionNamazi warns against services that “guarantee” they’ll get the domain name for you:
 
 
As responsible Registrars are advising, successful pre-registration of a domain cannot be guaranteed. ICANN seconds that advice, cautioning that registrants should be wary of anyone who claims to be able to guarantee a domain registration on a new gTLD. There are several situations that can impact the availability of a domain name and some domain names may never be available for purchase.”
 
 
Namazi points out that competition between registrars for a single domain, domains claimed in sunrise, reserved domains, premium domains, and name collision domains make it impossible to guarantee. He also notes that some TLDs may not even end up being delegated.

 

2. The first non-Latin character new gTLDs were delegated 

What does delegated mean? This means that the gTLDs or strings have successfully completed the new gTLD Program and has officially been selected as a new gTLD that will go live for use. This will be the first time non-Latin characters can be used in a TLD and not just in the second level domain. Click here for more information from ICANN. 

One is شبكة, the Arabic word for “web” or “network”, while another is 游戏, which means “game” in Chinese.The other two – онлайн and сайт – are both Russian words, meaning “online” and “website” respectively

3. First nine LATIN new gTLDs​ were delegated

The first nine new gTLDs delegated last week were:

  • .CAMERA
  • .CLOTHING
  • .EQUIPMENT
  • .GURU
  • .HOLDINGS
  • .LIGHTING
  • .SINGLES
  • .VENTURES
  • .VOYAGE

The “sunrise period” for registration of the first seven gTLDs is “.BIKE,” “.CLOTHING,” “.GURU,” “.HOLDINGS,” “.PLUMBING,” “.SINGLES,” “.VENTURES.” will begin November 26 and general availability to anyone will begin January 29, 2014.  Keep any eye out for new gTLDs as they are delegated. Consider whether you or your company wants to purchase a domain. And monitor the official launch of these new gTLDs starting in January. Monitor how your brand and ineffectual property are being used on this new gTLDs. To keep up with delegated strings click here.

4. The launch of new gTLDs multiplies the size of the Internet and presents increased security and intellectual property infringement risks.

  • Pay attention to the gTLD in the address bar. New gTLDs give malicious actors more platforms to attack the unsuspecting. Pay attention to the address you are trying to get to and make sure all parts of the address are correct.  Also if you search for a website make sure the site that comes up is the legitimate website.
  • Companies must monitor the use of their intellectual property on new gTLDs. Companies should currently have a plan in place to protect their IP investments through motoring, preemptive registrations, the Trademark Clearinghouse and other rights protection mechanisms provided by ICANN. Be proactive!

5. Launch of new gTLDs presents a number of opportunities to market your brand or yourself. This will present business and consumers with a new and unique user experience and online footprint. There will be a lot more room for customization online and opportunities for marketers to be creative with how to reach consumers. I am excited to see the innovative means of reaching the public that are birthed from the new gTLD launch.Please ask any questions you have about new gTLDs, protecting yourself, rights mechanisms, IP protection, security concerns etc. Start the discussion!